Chinese Superstitions About New Year Celebrations


Spread the love

In Chinese culture, the Lunar New Year is a significant event that is celebrated with various traditions and customs. However, it is also believed to be a time when bad luck and misfortune can easily strike. As such, there are numerous superstitions and beliefs associated with this holiday, ranging from the foods that should be eaten to the activities that should be avoided. In this discussion, we will explore some of the most common Chinese superstitions about the New Year and their significance.

The Significance of the Chinese New Year

the Chinese New Year is a significant event in the Chinese calendar, celebrated on the first day of the lunar calendar. The festivities last for 15 days and are a time of celebration and reunion for families. the Chinese New Year is steeped in traditions, many of which are rooted in superstition.

The Color Red

Red is a prominent color during the Chinese New Year. It is believed to be an auspicious color that brings good luck and wards off evil spirits. Red decorations are hung in homes and public spaces, and red envelopes containing money are given as gifts.

Key takeaway: Chinese New Year celebrations are steeped in traditions and superstitions, from the significance of the color red to the importance of certain foods. Cleaning before the holiday is encouraged, but cleaning on the first day of the New Year is discouraged. Fireworks, while popular, are subject to government restrictions due to safety and environmental concerns. Avoiding certain behaviors, such as crying and breaking things, is believed to ward off bad luck during the holiday.

The Red Underwear Superstition

Wearing red underwear during the Chinese New Year is believed to bring good luck and prosperity. It is especially popular among singles who are hoping to find love in the coming year.

Cleaning the House

Before the Chinese New Year, it is customary to clean the house thoroughly. It is believed that cleaning the house sweeps away bad luck and makes way for good luck to enter. However, cleaning on the first day of the Chinese New Year is discouraged, as it is believed to sweep away good luck.

See also  Old Chinese Superstitions: A Fascinating Look into the Beliefs and Traditions of Ancient China

Key takeaway: the Chinese New Year is a significant event celebrated for 15 days with traditions rooted in superstition. Red is an auspicious color that brings good luck, and fireworks are believed to scare away evil spirits. Cleaning the house before the New Year is encouraged, but cleaning on the first day is discouraged as it might sweep away good luck. Certain foods, such as dumplings and fish, are consumed for their beliefs in bringing wealth and prosperity, and alcohol is consumed to start the new year afresh. It’s important to avoid behavior such as crying or breaking things during the New Year as it is believed to bring bad luck.

Fireworks

Fireworks are an integral part of Chinese New Year celebrations. They are believed to scare away evil spirits and bring good luck. However, in recent years, the Chinese government has imposed restrictions on the use of fireworks due to safety concerns and environmental issues.

Key takeaway: the Chinese New Year is a significant event celebrated for 15 days, which is steeped in traditions rooted in superstition. Red decorations are hung in homes and public spaces as it is believed to bring good luck and ward off evil spirits. Cleaning the house before the Chinese New Year sweeps away bad luck and makes way for good luck. Fireworks are believed to scare away evil spirits and bring good luck. Certain foods are consumed because they bring good luck and prosperity. However, certain behaviors like crying, cleaning on the first day of the Chinese New Year, and breaking things are believed to bring bad luck.

The Nian Story

The use of fireworks during the Chinese New Year is also linked to the Nian story. According to legend, there was a vicious beast called Nian that would come out of hiding on the first day of the Chinese New Year to terrorize villagers. The villagers discovered that the beast was afraid of loud noises and the color red, hence the use of fireworks and red decorations during the Chinese New Year.

See also  Weird Chinese Superstitions

Food and Drink

Food and drink play a significant role in Chinese New Year celebrations. Certain foods are consumed because they are believed to bring good luck and prosperity.

Key takeaway: the Chinese New Year is a significant event in the Chinese calendar, celebrated on the first day of the lunar calendar. It is a time of celebration and reunion for families, and is steeped in traditions, many of which are rooted in superstition. The use of fireworks, the color red, cleaning the house, and certain foods and beverages are all important parts of the celebrations. However, there are also superstitions to avoid, such as crying, cleaning on the first day of the New Year, and breaking things, as these are believed to bring bad luck.

Dumplings

Dumplings are a popular food during the Chinese New Year. They are shaped like gold ingots and are believed to bring wealth and prosperity.

Fish

Fish is also a popular food during the Chinese New Year. The Chinese word for fish sounds similar to the word for surplus, hence the belief that eating fish will bring abundance and prosperity.

Alcohol

Alcohol is also consumed during Chinese New Year celebrations. Baijiu, a type of Chinese liquor, is believed to help people forget their troubles and start the new year afresh.

Superstitions to Avoid

Certain behaviors are believed to bring bad luck during the Chinese New Year.

Crying

Crying during the Chinese New Year is believed to bring bad luck. Children are often told not to cry, and parents may even pinch their children to prevent them from crying.

Cleaning

As mentioned earlier, cleaning on the first day of the Chinese New Year is discouraged, as it is believed to sweep away good luck.

Breaking Things

Breaking things during the Chinese New Year is believed to bring bad luck. It is especially important to avoid breaking porcelain, as it is believed to bring seven years of bad luck.

See also  Chinese Superstitions: Buying a House

FAQs for Chinese Superstitions about New Years

What are some common Chinese superstitions about New Years?

Chinese New Year is a time when many traditional beliefs and superstitions are widely observed. One of the most common is the belief that sweeping and cleaning the house on New Year’s Day will sweep away good luck. Also, it is considered unlucky to wear black or white during the festivities as these colors are traditionally worn at funerals. Eating dumplings is also an important tradition, as they represent wealth and prosperity.

What significance do firecrackers have during Chinese New Year?

Firecrackers are used extensively during Chinese New Year as they are believed to ward off evil spirits and bring good luck. According to legend, a monster named Nian would come out on New Year’s Eve to destroy houses and eat people, but he was scared away by loud noises and the color red. That’s why red clothing, decorations, and fireworks have become integral elements of the holiday celebrations.

Why is it important to pay off debts before Chinese New Year?

In Chinese culture, to start the New Year with debt is believed to invite bad luck and financial hardship throughout the year. As such, it’s customary to settle outstanding debts before the New Year arrives. This is also why many people avoid lending or borrowing money during the holiday season.

What are some other superstitions surrounding Chinese New Year?

One popular belief is that children should not cut their hair during the first month of the lunar year as it is perceived to affect their health and bring bad luck. Another superstition is that breaking a dish during the New Year celebrations might bring misfortune. Lastly, people avoid using sharp objects such as knives and scissors as they are believed to cut off good luck.

Francis

Francis Bangayan Actually I'm an Industrial Management Engineering, BSc Mechanical, Computer Science and Microelectronics I'm Very Passionate about the subject of Feng and furthered my studies: Feng Shui Mastery Course Bazi Mastery Course Flying Stars Feng Shui Course 8 Mansions Feng Shui Course Studied with the most prestigious Feng Shui and Bazi Master in Malaysia and Singapore with Master Joey Yap and Master Francis Leyau and Master TK Lee https://www.fengshuimastery.com/Fengshui-testimonials.htm http://www.masteryacademy.com/index.asp

Recent Content

link to Dragonfly Landing on You: A Sign of Good Luck?

Dragonfly Landing on You: A Sign of Good Luck?

Have you ever wondered if a dragonfly landing on you is a sign of good luck? In many cultures, dragonflies hold deep spiritual symbolism, and if one lands on you, it is believed to bring...

link to Rainbow Myths: Is Pointing at One Bad Luck?

Rainbow Myths: Is Pointing at One Bad Luck?

Growing up, many of us were taught that pointing at a rainbow is bad luck. This belief has been passed down through generations and is rooted in various cultures and traditions. But is there any...